Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Wildflowers - Some Found, Some Purchased

Earlier this month I was able to go up to the SC Native Plant Society plant sale.  There were lots of great plants to be purchased.  I missed the sale last year, so I was ready this year....I even brought my wagon with me.

The haul included two Ilex verticillata- deciduous hollies- one male one female, two Lindera benzoin- Spicebush, a native azalea, a green coneflower- Rudbeckia laciniata, Vernonia noveboracensis- Ironweed, and a pitcher plant- Sarracenia rubra.
Last year when we were at the North Carolina Arboretum I was drooling over the beautiful pitcher plants.  One might even say I coveted those beauties.  As I made my first lap at the native plant sale, it was the first thing I put in my wagon.  Hot dog.   I had been thinking about a spot for it since last year...before I knew I could find one for sale.   It seems to be quite happy in a low spot in the full sun in my backyard.  Cross your fingers that it stays as happy as it seems to be so far!

Planting native plants makes such good sense to me.  These are the plants that need no extra coddling once established.  They are beneficial to the animals or insects in your garden.  For example, the Lindera benzoin, spicebush, is a host plant for the Spicebush butterfly...who wouldn't want more butterflies in their garden?   The hollies will be a food source for birds in the winter and who doesn't love those red berries?  Great color in the winter landscape.
More updates on the other newbies as they grow and flourish in the garden.  

The first spring we lived here I found some Leucothoe Doghobble,  growing in the lowlands by the lake.  I moved some into the garden part of the backyard and hoped it would take hold.  There are three different Leucothoe... L. fontanesiana, L. axillaris, L. racemosa....all of them native.  I am not sure which one mine might be, but sure love the delicate white blooms.  They are similar to the little bells of the native Vaccinium and Pieris japonica.

 The leaves are arranged alternately along a crooked stem, hobbled...hence the name Doghobble.  Sometimes common names are so unflattering.


You might remember the Aesculus pavia Red Buckeye trees (six inch tall) I brought with me from Virginia.  I have nurtured these little guys for the last three years....this year one of them put forth a flower stalk.  This is a great tree to have in your garden as it is one of the early bloomers that attract hummingbirds.

Hoping next year that the second one will put up a flower stalk as well.
Another red trumpet flower that attracts the hummingbirds this time of year is the native honeysuckle, Lonicera sempervirens.  I cut this one back hard last year to replace the support it was growing on with a larger one.   Didn't seem to bother it too much, there are lots of flowers.


Two deciduous azaleas in the garden have been blooming in the last few weeks.  This one is Rhododendron x 'Tallulah Sunrise'

A new one this year is Rhododendron x 'Lemon Lights'  Sure glad this one bloomed, my other yellow one, 'Admiral Semmes' hasn't bloomed this year....looks like the flower buds were nibbled.

This time of year in the South the non-native Wisteria are blooming...those that are taking over the landscape... can you say invasive?   I am a sucker for purple blooms....so when I found this native Wisteria, I  tried to figure out where I could plant it, finally deciding along the driveway.  Meet Wisteria frutescens 'Amethyst Falls'.   More on this one when these buds open!

There are other vines blooming in the woods now, this is one I had hoped to find on my property, but so far no luck.  This one is on the property a couple lots over.  Bignonia capreolata, Crossvine...another trumpet shaped bloom frequented by those cute little hummingbirds.

This find in my front woods is a nice surprise...I believe it to be Amelanchier arborea, Serviceberry.  Maybe it is not... but for now that is my ID.   Any other ideas as to its identification?

When taking the dogs for a walk I always have my eyes open-- never know what little blooms will come into view.  This is a Sisyrinchium albidum, White blue-eyed grass.  We have the Blue-eyed grass growing here as well, though right now it is the white one blooming.  

Today before we went out on the boat I was pulling weeds (lots of them!) along the bank.  I came upon a new flower, a mystery.  I have never seen this blooming in my yard before.   The petals are shiny and the foliage looks like flat leaf parsley.  Any ideas?  I like these little surprises.  Hope it comes back again next year.


For those of you who are interested in more native plants and wildflowers, head over to Gail's blog- Clay and Limestone for Wildflower Wednesday.  I know I have learned a lot from her posts....and those who also participate in the Wildflower postings.  

You never know who is eating bugs in your garden.....Eastern Fence Lizard-- make sure you don't use pesticides.


©Copyright 2012 Janet. All rights reserved. Content created by Janet for The Queen of Seaford. words and photos by Janet,The Queen of Seaford.

44 comments:

  1. Wow, some beauties in your garden! I "rescued" some blue-eyed grass last year and I hope they will come up. My foam flower is just about to bloom along with the three flames including a yellow one. It is an exciting time here with something new each day. On my walk today I passed a white and pink trillium. Glad I was able to see them because I think the blooms are fairly short-lived.

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    1. Lynn, you need to come down here. Hope your rescued Blue-eyed grass comes back. I like finding it in the edges of the yard. LOVE that trillium you found, great photo.

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  2. I recently went a native plant sale and told myself I would just look but of course came home with a yellow raspberry vine. :o) Your azaleas are beautiful! Smart lizard to make your garden his home.

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    1. Tammy, who can "just look"? Look forward to seeing your yellow raspberry vine. I am really happy with my azaleas.

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  3. I envy you your pitcher plant, Janet. The A. pavia almost looks surreal in that close up. I wrote about it just recently. I'm awaiting delivery of a Lonicera sempervirens. Hoping to make the hummers happy.

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    1. Helen, thanks! I am still pinching myself after getting that pitcher plant. Hope you have great success with the lonicera...mine are going great.

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  4. Beautiful flowers!
    I especially like the Rhodys
    Happy Gardening!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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    1. Lea, thanks, me too!! Loving that yellow one!

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  5. Dear Janet,
    I love wildfowers - and you have such a spacious garden! Here on my balcony I was surprised that one wildflower came with me from Hamburg: a simple buttercup opens its blossoms near my rose (and it looks a bit like your unknown find - but only the flower, not the leaves).

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    1. Britta, I love them too. I am glad you have at least one wildflower in your limited space.

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  6. What a nice haul of plants you collected in your little red wagon Janet. I particularly like the Rhododendron x 'Lemon Lights' and the simple white Leucothoe Doghobble. The mystery service berry looks to be just that. I think the Blue-eyed grass is so dainty and sweet.

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    1. Jennifer, I think it is a great haul too. One of these days I will slow down on the buying....hahahah who am I kidding? Hoping my mystery is indeed serviceberry.

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  7. A pitcher plant! How exciting! I think these are so unique and exotic looking. I hope yours does well. I love your native azaleas. I have one, but it didn't bloom this year. However, a favorite of mine is the crossvine. You are right - the hummers love it!

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    1. Spicebush and trumpet honeysuckle are two of my favorites! I can confirm about the Lonicera attracting hummingbirds, but I have yet to find a spicebush swallowtail caterpillar. I envy your red buckeye.

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    2. Jason, thanks, I am thrilled to have the spicebush !! Yes, saw a hummingbird on the lonicera and the buckeye recently.

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    3. Holley Garden, I think the pitcher plant is really unusual and yes, exotic too. Native azaleas rock.

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  8. Great choices --all of them. I think I saw these on one of your FB posts? I am happy you got the Spicebush...mine put out some buds this year and I was so excited since I'd only just planted it in the fall. Just hoping the 'other' one is the opposite sex so it will get berries ;) What a cute little yellow bloom that is...I have no idea but I hope someone can i.d.it for ya. That little guy is certainly different than any critter I've seen up this way!

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    1. Jan, thanks! I think so too. Yes, you may have seen many on FB.

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  9. Oooh...pitcher plant envy! I hate that I missed the native plant sale. Every year, I try to go--but some soccer game or such interferes with my plans (darn kids!) ;-) I love your native azaleas and plan to get more, since our chickens demolished them. (Darn chickens!) We have spice bush planted throughout the forest, and I love it. I just bought the red honeysuckle and hope to entice some hummingbirds with it. The crossvine is so pretty--your photos are gorgeous, as always! Happy gardening!

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    1. Julie, hahaha, yes, I understand the envy...that's why I had to get one. I know kids' schedules can get in the way.

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  10. Hello there, Janet – great final message :-) I love that Sisyrinchium albidum, and I’m a wisteria fan too so I’ll try to remember to resist to see it in bloom.

    So many wonderful plants to comment on but I wish you luck and many blooms with your pitcher plant. I picked a couple up at a plant show back in 2011 but don’t think I put it in the best location. I’m thinking I could set aside an area beside my new wildlife pond (work still in progress).

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    1. Shirley, thanks for coming by!!! I love the Blue-eyed grasses around here. The native wisteria is blooming now. Thanks, crossing my fingers on the pitcher plant.

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  11. Love your red wagon, everyone needs one of those! love the red flowers of that honeysuckle, so beautiful and I'll bet they smell wonderful

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    1. Marguerite, hahah, I love my wagon too! Yes, the red honeysuckle is great... though no real fragrance.

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  12. Lucky that your natives are so lovely...and that you can bring your little red wagon.

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  13. Flowering Buckeyes are so pretty. I am glad your is doing so well. Sounds like you are adding some wonderful additions to the gardens. I have been wanting a Spicebush but do not know where I would stick one around here. The Yellow Azalea is so beautiful. Have a wonderful weekend.

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    1. Lona, thanks, I really like the bold yellow of the azalea, great plant.

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  14. Lots of great natives featured in this post! Your plant definitely looks like a serviceberry judging by the leaves, although the flowers look a little different from the ones here.

    The Eastern Fence Lizard looks like a tiny dragon!

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    1. Sweetbay, thanks, I hope you are correct about the serviceberry. crossing my fingers.
      Yes, those Fence Lizard do look like little dragons.

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  15. I remember those pitcher plants, too! Glad you were able to get such great finds at the native plant sale. We have one coming up in two weeks, but they usually have only a small selection. Ever since last year's Fling, I have been on the lookout for Indian pinks; so far, I've found only two online sources, both of which are pretty expensive. For a plant that is supposed to be a native, you would think they would be more readily available. Lots of lovely blooms--your red buckeye is a beauty.

    If I were a bug, I'd sure crawl away quickly from Mr. Lizard:)

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    1. Rose, weren't those pitcher plants wonderful?? Mine is a different variety but still a pitcher plant!
      I bought my Indian Pinks at the native sale a few years ago....not doing as well as one would think.

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  16. I want a lizard in my garden :(

    We never see them here but I bet they are around. I love your new natives and have many or have bought similar ones...I agree they make the most sense.

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    1. Donna@GEV, we have plenty lizards...come and get some!!

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  17. I love native plant sales and just attended our local one on Thursday. I'm always guilty of having a bigger (plant) appetite than common sense. In Mobile, I grew many of the plants you're mentioning - crossvine, blue-eyed grass, native azaleas, Leucothoe - and your post makes me a little homesick. At least I can still grow red buckeye, which I love!

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    1. Gaia Gardener, Cynthia, I love native plant sales....you get such interesting plants. Hope you are growing a Red Buckeye!

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  18. Lemon Lights is very showy. I like the lizard, no lizards like that here!

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    1. Donna @GWGT, yes it is very showy....makes me happy.
      We have lots of these little guys.

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  19. I love Buckeye and serviceberry, but never have gotten either. You've collected great varieties of natives and your posts are always so informative.

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    1. Freda, thanks. You should get a buckeye, such a great small tree.

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  20. Your yellow flower looks like a buttercup (Ranunculus sp). I am slowly learning the wildflowers due to so many new ones on our property. It is a treat to explore. I've not seen buttercups yet though. Very nice on the orange azaleas. I love those bright colors! And your wagon too. That's the way to be prepared. I think your pitcher plant looks great!

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    1. Tina, I am not sure if it is a Ranunculus or not....will post more pictures in the future. Exploring new property is a lot of fun!

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  21. You have a beautiful selection of shrubs in your garden, that yellow rhododendron is a real dazzler, proof that just because a plant is unfashionable is no reason to ignore it. I agree with you about planting natives, it makes such great sense, particularly if you don't want to have to fuss over your plants and want to make a welcoming environment for wildlife.

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    1. Janet, thanks so much. Yes the yellow one does dazzle, sure brightens a shady spot.

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